See Luminosity

Part 2: Comprehensive Sex Education – Secular Sex Coming to Your Children

Part 2: Comprehensive Sex Education – Secular Sex Coming to Your Children

**WARNING: THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS EXTREMELY GRAPHIC, SEXUAL MATERIAL. PLEASE USE DISCRETION IN OPENING AND READING.**

Read the other parts of this series here:

Part 1: Secular Sex Values: The New Standard for the World

Part 2: Comprehensive Sex Education, Secular Sex Coming to Your Children

Part 3: The Man Who Changed Morality: Sex Researcher Alfred Kinsey

Part 4: Alfred Kinsey and Cultural Moral Transformation

Part 5: The Power of Biblical Sex

Part 6: The Power of Sex Gone Wrong

Part 7: Sex and Worldview: A Battle for the Soul

Part 8: Summary: How Sex Has Changed the World

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Sex is the world’s new weapon.

It has always been Satan’s weapon, but now sex is being used as a widespread tool for cultural change – a change toward a secular view of the world.

Part 1 listed the principles of secular sexuality, and showed examples of how these principles are present in a variety of guidelines for sexual education around the world. This article will address the ways these secular sexual principles are present in specific sexual education curricula used with children of all ages. Later parts will contrast these secular principles with those of scripture – and demonstrate how secular sexuality changes the way people think about reality and truth.

In addition to the United Nations’ International Guidelines for Sexuality, the principles for sex outlined by the Report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Education, the Yogayakarta Principles, and the It’s All One resource kit, (addressed in Part 1), secular sexuality is predominant throughout sexual education materials used to teach children worldwide.

Types of Sexual Education for Children

There are four major types of sexual education approaches:

 

  1. Biological Education – This sexual education is limited to the physical functions of the reproductive system, and is often thought of as “value-free”. It does not address the interpersonal, emotional, or spiritual aspects of sexuality, and is usually taught as part of a health or biology class. Advocates of both Abstinence-Only Education and advocates of Comprehensive Sexual Education generally consider Biological Education to be inadequate and ineffective.
  2. Abstinence Only Education – This instruction is generally strongly grounded in religious moral principles about sexuality, and focuses on abstaining from sexual activity until marriage. It focuses on abstinence from all sexual behaviors, and incorporates information on relationships, with a focus on marriage. The programs also typically address some interpersonal skills such as decision-making, communication, and refusal skills. Abstinence-Only Education does not provide information about contraception or methods of disease prevention, except to explain contraception failure rates. Traditional abstinence curricula was found to devote almost 54% of their content to abstinence-related material, 17.4% toward healthy relationships and marriage, and 0% to promoting contraception.[1] In schools that offer these programs, information about the biological aspects of reproduction (including contraception) are often taught in separate health or biology classes[2].
  3. Abstinence-Plus Education – Emphasizes abstinence, but also teaches about contraception and disease prevention as secondary strategies. The programs, which are generally offered to middle and high school students, often include topics related to interpersonal relationships, and decision-making. Many abstinence-only advocates argue that Abstinence-Plus Education is virtually indistinguishable from Comprehensive Sexual Education[3].
  4. Comprehensive Sexual Education (CSE) – The umbrella term for secular sexual education that starts in Kindergarten through 12th grade, and includes topics of human development and sexual anatomy, pregnancy, relationships, decision-making, personal skills, contraception, sexual response, disease prevention, sexual health, society and culture (including sexual orientation and gender identity).[4]  Grounded in a decidedly secular view of sexuality and the world, CSE emphasizes the right of everyone to sexual expression, gender and orientation diversity, the right to abortion, childhood sex experimentation, and the normality of sex outside of marriage. CSE was found to devote 4.7% of their content to abstinence, and 0% toward healthy relationships and marriage, and 28.6% to contraception.[5]

Themes in Comprehensive Sexual Education

Comprehensive Sexual Education (CSE) is the primary method through which secular values of sexuality are promoted. CSE is being touted as “scientifically-based” and the most effective means for helping children delay the onset sexual intercourse and increase contraceptive use,[6] and proponents of CSE almost always criticize abstinence-only programs as being ineffective. (Check footnote for more information on research related to effective abstinence-only programs.)[7] CSE programs are used throughout the world, including in America, and include key themes:[8]

 

  1. Harm reduction as the primary strategy rather than harm elimination. This focuses on contraception education and distribution (particularly condoms) to reduce the likelihood of sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy, and emphasizes abortion if contraception fails.
  2. Little to no respect for parental authority, and an encouragement of youth undermining parental authority if parents’ expectations conflict with the themes of comprehensive sexual education.
  3. Risk taking and experimentation encouraged in order to reach full sexual potential and fulfillment.
  4. Condoms promoted as being “safe” and “effective” without adequate addressing of failure rates – an insinuation that condoms are infallible.
  5. Youth encouraged to wait to have sex until they “feel ready” as opposed to waiting until marriage.
  6. An advocating for the acceptance and exploration of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities.
  7. Abortion portrayed as safe, without significant consequences for the mother (or even beneficial for her), and as an individual reproductive choice involving simply the woman’s body.
  8. Children understood to be sexual from birth.
  9. Oral sex, anal sex, and masturbation encouraged.
  10. Sexual pleasure as a right for all persons, including youth.

First we will explore examples of these themes in specific CSE curricula used internationally, and then we will take a look at how these secular sexuality themes are being implemented closer to home – in America.

Sample International CSE

You, Your Life, Your Dreams[9]

You, Your Life, Your Dreams, is a typical comprehensive sex ed program (CSE) in which these themes are evident. It was developed by Family Care International, a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) that consults with the Untied Nations. The program is used with adolescents aged 14-19 in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. The following are quotes from the curriculum:

  • “Our feelings about our family and our relationships with our parents may also change. Your parents may give you more responsibilities, which is a nice sign that they trust and rely on you. But they might also start being very strict —keeping you from your friends and trying to make decisions for you about your schooling or your future.” (p. 2)
  • Often, for the first time, you see things differently than your parents do. You may feel like questioning your parents’ beliefs and reasons. You may want to experience life first-hand, rather than simply rely on what others tell you. You may want to try new things for yourself, and, at times, to take risks. (pp. 14-15)
  • You can choose the best of both worlds—the best of your traditional culture and the best of “modern” culture. You can embrace what you like and think is good, and you can reject those things that you think are bad. (p. 73)
  • “While many of your values may be similar to those of your family, some may be different. If you want to live by different values than those of your parents, that is fine, but don’t criticise your parents for their beliefs—even if they seem too old-fashioned or traditional to you.” (p. 76)
  • “No one ever teaches you in school or at home what healthy sexuality is….“Even the people you know and love can also confuse you about sex and sexuality. Most parents don’t want to talk about sex with their children, so it can be hard to learn much from them.” (pp. 94-95)
  • “It can be difficult for parents to recognise that you are becoming an adult who can think for himself or herself and who has his or her own opinions. They still think of you as a child. Be patient with them while they adjust to this big change in you….Your parents often think they know what is best for you, even when they don’t. “ (p. 73-74)
  • Many people who use condoms say they make sex more enjoyable for both partners. Both partners can relax more when they are not worried about the possibility of pregnancy or getting an STI. Some men also say that using a condom helps them to avoid ejaculating or “coming” too soon and to give more pleasure to their partners” (p. 122)
  • Although some religions and cultures consider homosexuality to be wrong, abnormal and a habit that can be changed, most experts think that people’s sexual orientation and feelings are not something they can control— any more than they can control the colour of their skin or the texture of their hair. In other words, homosexuality is probably not a deliberate choice that someone makes, and it cannot be changed through praying, will-power or having sex with someone of the opposite sex.” (p. 98)
  • “At some point in their lives, most people have sexual feelings, thoughts, dreams, and attractions to someone of the same sex. Two close friends (either two boys or two girls) might have a crush on each other. They like being together and at times feel physically attracted to each other. Some people find these feelings confusing or upsetting, but they are normal and many people experience such feelings at some time in their lives”. (p. 98)
  • Sexual intercourse is only one way that people express sexual feelings. But there are plenty of other ways that people express these feelings—from talking to each other and holding hands to hugging, cuddling, kissing and touching each other. These ways of expressing sexual feelings can be very sexy and satisfying—and they carry little risk of HIV infection”. (p. 96)
  • “Masturbation is the act of touching one’s own sexual organs—the penis, vagina, breasts or other parts of the body that are sensitive to sexual stimulation. Masturbation is another way that people sometimes express their sexual feelings… Some girls and boys start masturbating when they are children and continue to do so all their lives. (p. 96)
  • “It is obscene to touch the vagina. Not true! The vagina is just like any other part of your body. Touching it is just like touching your ear. But your vagina is a very private part, so you should only touch it when you are all alone.” (p. 32)
  • “For some people, the breasts are very sensitive to touch. Touching can be sexually exciting, and this might lead you to go farther than you really want to go.” (p. 31)
  • “If you do have sex, always use a condom. If used correctly and consistently, condoms can protect you from HIV and other STIs. (p. 114)

Other Sex-Ed Materials Around the World

In addition to the You, Your Life, Your Dreams curriculum, (and the It’s All One curriculum mentioned in Part 1), there are many other examples of this secular sexual agenda in sex ed materials throughout the world. The themes of secular sexuality are present in all of them, in varying levels of explicitness.

For example, a UNICEF-produced sexual education manual used in Mexico, called Taller de salud sexual y reproductiva para madres y embarazadas adolescentes: Propuesta Metodologica[10] explains that one can obtain sexual pleasure from “masturbation, sexual relations with a partner – whether heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual; a sexual response that is directed toward inanimate objects, minors, non-consenting persons”. (p. 89) [emphasis mine].

Similarly, another sex-ed manual, published by the UNFPA and used in Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador, teaches children that “It is common for boys to have frequent sexual intercourse with other boys”[11] and that “Women and men with a full sexual identity have erotic preferences for people of the opposite sex, of their own sex, and of both sexes”.[12]

A pamphlet produced by the UN-Funded IPPF (International Planned Parenthood Federation), entitled “Healthy, Happy, and Hot”[13], encourages young people living with HIV to experiment sexually, explaining that they “have the right to sexual pleasure” (p. 9). Using highly explicit sexual details, the guide explains ways for these youth to give sexual pleasure, and asserts, “You have the right to decide if, when and how to disclose your HIV status” to a sexual partner (p. 2). The guide even goes on to say that laws which require HIV positive persons to reveal their HIV-positive status to potential sexual partners “violate the rights of persons living with HIV” (p. 6). In other words, this pamphlet tells HIV positive youth that they not only do NOT have to inform sexual partners that they have a deadly disease which can be transmitted to that partner – but that it violates that HIV-positive youth’s rights to have to do so.

These are just a few of the CSE curricula currently being promoted and utilized to teach children worldwide. However, the secular values of sexuality in CSE are not only present in resources for other countries – they can be found much closer to home.

Sex Ed in America and SIECUS

CSE is not simply being pushed in other countries; it is prevalent here in the United States. Although sexual education in much of the world is coordinated by national governments in conjunction with the United Nations and its NGOs (Non-Government Organizations, such as the International Planned Parenthood Federation), at this point, is that there is no federal law in the United States that requires sex education[14]. As a result, decisions about sexual education are left to the states and to local school districts. This means that sexual education guidelines and programs vary greatly from school system to school system in America. For example, Chicago Public Schools recently mandated that sexual education in public schools begin in Kindergarten.[15]

CSE is more prevalent in more liberal areas, while abstinence-based sex ed occurs more frequently in conservative locales, however there is a tremendous push, both through policy, media[16], and financial incentives[17], for CSE to be implemented across the board, in accordance with international guidelines. According to the Guttmacher Institute, 22 states and the District of Columbia mandate sex education.[18] Furthermore, the standardization of guidelines for education through the new Common Core Curriculum (which all but 5 states have adopted) makes the potential for CSE to become a mandatory part of the academic curriculum very great, indeed.

SIECUS, the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, is the primary disseminator of sexual education in the U.S., and strongly propagates CSE for all public education.  SIECUS is, essentially, ground zero for comprehensive sexual education in the U.S., and it has been very effective at establishing CSE, and secular sexuality, throughout America.[19]

SIECUS was co-founded by Dr. Mary Calderone, former medical director of Planned Parenthood[20], out of the Kinsey Institute in Bloomington, Indiana[21]. Start-up funding for the project included money from Hugh Hefner’s Playboy Enterprises.[22] The organization was created as the education wing of the Kinsey Institute, for the purpose of disseminating Kinseyan-based sexuality through public schools.[23] Now, in conjunction with Planned Parenthood and other organizations, SIECUS helps schools develop sex ed curricula, trains teachers to teach sex ed, and advocates for policy related to the right for all students to CSE. According to their website, “SIECUS works to create a world that ensures social justice and sexual rights.”[24] Dr. Calderone explained to the Association of Planned Parenthood Physicians that the primary goal of SIECUS was to teach sexuality “very broadly and deeply with awareness of the vital importance of infant and childhood sexuality.”[25]

The connection between America’s and the world’s international standards for sexuality is clear, evidenced by the fact that one of the main authors of UNSECO’s International Guidelines on Sexuality Education (mentioned in Part 1), Nanette Ecker, was also Director of International Education and Training at SIECUS.[26] Secular sexuality throughout the world is tied by the same thread, all from the spool of the Kinsey Institute – an issue that will be addressed in Parts 3 and 4.

SIECUS’ Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education

SIECUS, like the United Nations, has published its own Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education for the U.S.,[27] which echo the same themes of secular sexuality found in CSE around the world. These guidelines are for sex ed for American children in Kindergarten through 12th grade. The following are quotes from these guidelines:

Level 1 (ages 5-8)

  • “A boy/man has nipples, a penis, a scrotum, and testicles”. (p. 25)
  • “A girl/woman has breasts, nipples, a vulva, a clitoris, a vagina, a uterus, and ovaries”. (p. 25)
  • “Both boys and girls have body parts that feel good when touched”. (p. 25)
  • “Vaginal intercourse – when a penis is placed inside a vagina – is the most common way for a sperm and egg to join”.  (p. 26)
  • “Human beings can love people of the same gender and people of another gender”. (p. 29)
  • “Some people are homosexual, which means they can be attracted to and fall in love with someone of the same gender”. (p. 29)
  • “Homosexual men and women are also known as gay men and lesbians”. (p. 29)
  • “Many people live in lifetime committed relationships, even though they may not be legally married”. (p. 39)
  • “Two people of the same gender can live in loving, lifetime committed relationships”. (p. 39)
  • “Touching and rubbing one’s own genitals to feel good is called masturbation”. (p. 51)
  • “Both girls and boys may discover that their bodies feel good when touched”. (p. 54)

Level 2 (ages 9-12)

  • “During puberty, some boys may ejaculate while they are asleep which is called a nocturnal emission or ‘wet dream.’” (p. 26)
  • “Gay men, lesbians, and bisexual people can have their own children or adopt”. (p. 29)
  • “Some people are bisexual, which means they can be attracted to and fall in love with people of the same or another gender.” (p. 29)
  • “Gender identity refers to a person’s internal sense of being male, female, or a combination of these”. (p. 31)
  • “To make a good decision one must consider all of the possible consequences, good and bad, and choose the action that one believes will have the best outcome.” (p. 44)
  • “Being sexual with another person usually involves more than sexual intercourse”. (p. 53)
  • “Human beings have natural, physical responses to sexual stimulation”. (p. 55)

Level 3 (Ages 12-15)

  • “Understanding one’s sexual orientation can be an evolving process”. (p. 30)
  • “Many scientific theories have concluded that sexual orientation cannot be changed by therapy or medicine”. (p. 30)
  • “Some people’s gender identity differs from their biological sex”. (p. 31)
  • “Transgender is also used as a general term to describe many different identities that exist such as “transsexual,” “drag king,” “drag queen,” “crossdresser,” “genderqueer,” “shapeshifter,” “bigendered,” and “androgyne. (p. 31)
  • “Some cultures around the world recognize and have special roles for transgender individuals”. (p. 31)
  • “All people, regardless of biological sex, gender, age, ability, and culture, are sexual beings.” (p. 51)
  • “Sexual feelings, fantasies, and desires are natural”. (p. 51)
  • “Sexual relationships can be more fulfilling in a loving relationship”. (p. 53)
  • “There are many ways to give and receive sexual pleasure without having intercourse”. (p. 54)
  • “Women and men may be sexually aroused by thoughts, feelings, sights, smells, sounds, and touches”. (p. 55)

Level 4 (Ages 15-18)

  • “The understanding and identification of one’s sexual orientation may change over the course of his/her lifetime”. (p. 30)
  • “As people get older, they may continue to discover new forms of sexual expression to share with a partner”. (p. 53)

Without a doubt, the principles of secular sexuality undergird every part of these standards – the national guidelines for what American children are expected to be taught about sexuality. But reading the guidelines do not tell the whole story; to understand just how explicitly these values are being taught, it is necessary to investigate some specific CSE programs and materials.

Secular Sexuality in American CSE Programs

About Your Sexuality

About Your Sexuality was the first sex education program for youth that affirmed homosexual sex was natural and normal.[28] Written by Deryck Calderwood, a disciple of sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, in 1970[29], this program was published by the Unitarian Universalist Association, and used with children as young as 12. The educational kit used film strips as part of its “education”, which depicted explicit, hard-core scenes of heterosexual and homosexual intercourse, including a female couple using a dildo, and condomless anal sex.[30] In 1988 the program came under attack by parents in Connecticut[31], and was later replaced by a curriculum entitled “Our Whole Lives”[32] – which exchanged the explicit film strips with “tastefully rendered line drawings”. [33]

Mark Schoen, who worked with Calderwood as a photographer to make the film strips for About Your Sexuality, launched SexSmart Films – a company that produces explicit sex films known as “sexual health films” for “therapists, educators, and individuals”. The films, for which Schoen has won a variety of awards, are essentially explicit pornography utilized under the guise of “promoting sexual literacy”. They are used as part of sex education projects around the world, including those by SIECUS and Planned Parenthood.[34]

Wardell Pomeroy’s Books

Wardell Pomeroy, co-author with pioneer sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, wrote a popular set of books called Boys and Sex and Girls and Sex. These books were recommended as companion resources to CSE programs (including in the Planned Parenthood of Central California CSE program Let’s Talk About S-E-X, for ages 9-12[35]). Wardell’s books were so controversial that they were banned in many schools; Boys and Sex is on the American Library Association’s 100 most frequently challenged books of 1990-2000.[36] Noteworthy elements:

 

  • Girls and Sex encourages girlfriends to stimulate one another to orgasm[37].
  • On sex between children: “Society may frown on sex play between children, but we have to remember that society disapproves of a great many sexual acts that take place, and there are two sides to the story.”[38]
  • On homosexuality: “With the greater sexual freedom we enjoy today, permitting more experimentation, some people have discovered they enjoy relations with both sexes. In doing this, they are only following what we learn as children. Sexually, children act very much like other animals…all species of mammals have homosexual relations.”[39]
  • About masturbation in Boys and Sex: “A pleasurable and exciting experience…It releases tensions and is therefore valuable in many ways. …It provides a full outlet for fancy, for daydreaming, which is characteristic of adolescence…It enriches an individual’s sex life by offering variety….”.[40] In this section, the book explains that “in the search for sexual pleasure, the human male has thought of just about everything”, and goes on to detail a variety of variant masturbation techniques, including the insertion of objects into different orifices while masturbating.[41]
  • On pre-marital sex: “Your grandparents believed…that they were somehow obligated to marry if they had intercourse, but few people believe that now….The relationship may end with intercourse, and then the boy goes on to a different kind, or the same kind, of relationship with another girl. It’s all part of the process of growing up.”[42] “If you’re having sex with someone you have no intention of marrying…it can be a good training ground for a more committed experience later on….it’s like taking a car out on a test run before you buy it”.[43]
  • On fantasies: “[Boys] might have fantasies of having sex with their sisters, a teacher, or even their mothers or fathers…They may think about forcing someone else to have sex with them, or of being forced themselves. These daydreams needn’t be (and usually aren’t) any more harmful than the common daydreams boys have about being the best baseball player in the world…The only harm that can come from them is guilt…”[44]
  • On sex with children: “What is against the law everywhere is for grown men to have sex with boys…Fortunately it’s virtually impossible to enforce such laws; otherwise, there would not be enough jails to hold all the offenders”.[45]
  • Even bestiality is addressed: “There are case histories of boys who built up a strong emotional attachment to a particular animal and have had intercourse with it whenever possible….This kind of sexual behavior may never happen to you…If it does, you would be best advised to keep any knowledge of it to yourself so you can avoid either ridicule or punishment, or both.”[46] Earlier versions of the book included this: “Any of the farm animals may become a sexual object — ponies, calves, sheep, pigs, even chickens or ducks. Dogs are also commonly used, but cats rarely”. [47]
  • In Boys and Sex, the question is posed: “Are necrophilia [sex with a corpse] and bestiality [sex with an animal] moral or immoral?” The author’s answer: “That depends entirely on your point of view”.[48]

Changing Bodies, Changing Lives

The themes of secular sexuality are evident in all American CSE programs.  For example, Changing Bodies, Changing Lives: A Book for Teens on Sex and Relationships[49] is one of the most popular sex ed texts in the U.S., and has been used in thousands of high schools since 1980[50].  This incredibly graphic curriculum for includes detailed pictures of naked male and female bodies and sexual parts, as well as shockingly graphic commentary. Here are some excerpts (the most graphic terms have been replaced with elipses):

 

  • Under the section entitled “When and Why You Have Erections, this comment from “Tony” is provided: “Whenever I hear a vacuum cleaner, I start getting hard. That must be because I used to love those days when I’d stay home from school, sick, and I’d be up in my room while my mother was vaccuming downstairs. That’s a real good memory” (p. 17). A seventeen-year-old girl is quoted about her first experience with seeing an erection: “I’ve seen my brother naked, but I’d never seen an erect penis until the other night. When my boyfriend pulled his out of his pants, I nearly croaked. ‘My God, where have you been hiding that thing’? No way it could have been in his pocket all that time” (p. 17). Another comment by Tom explains, “I get a hard-on in drama class almost every time I have to go up on stage. I can never tell if they are laughing at my performance or at my bulging c…”(p. 18).
  • Under the section entitled “Making Semen and Ejaculating”, comments by thirteen-year-old Mike are provided: “I have fantasies just about every night before I go to sleep. I lie there with all these sexy things going on in my head, and of course my hand always seems to make it down to my c…. This one time I got real hard and my b… started itching, like, and then there was this liquid shooting out of my c…. It felt amazing. I went to sleep with a big smile that night.” (p. 20)
  • Under the topic “Learning About Sex”: “Lots of children…do ‘research’ on their own: Polly is from New York: ‘There was this one girl in my grammar school class…that me and my girlfriends used to play doctor with, and she was always the patient. We would make her take her pants off and we’d pretend to stick her with things, like giving her a needle…and we’d go up to this room we have in our attic where we knew we could be private. Even now I can remember it being sort of thrilling to me that she would take her pants off.’”[51]
  • Also under “Learning About Sex”: “Like Polly, you might have played games that let you do some early exploring of bodies and sexual feelings. Eighteen year old Jeff remembers: ‘I was always experimenting with sex, ever since I was really little. Like even at nursery school, it made no difference to me whether it was with a boy or a girl, we’d roll around together and feel each other and get naked together…and of course it felt good.”[52]
  • Under the heading for Chapter 3: “Changing Sexuality”: Many people think you aren’t sexual until you actually start having sexual activity with another person. Watch any naked baby and you’ll see this isn’t true. Babies explore their bodies all the time; they love to be held and stroked; and they often play with their genitals, when they can find them. From the beginning, we are all sexual.”[53]
  • Under the heading “Homosexual Sex”: “People sometimes wonder what it is that homosexuals do. In fact there is nothing so different about what girls do together. Sometimes they might lie together and press their bodies against each other, or one might caress the other’s…and… with her hand or tongue. Some girls like inserting dildos into their partner’s…or…; others don’t. Gay men, too, have many ways of making love. They may caress each other’s…with their hand or mouth. Or one may put his … in the other’s….” (p. 147).

Learning About Sex

Gary F. Kelly, sexuality educator, professor and counselor for over 40 years, developed an award-winning CSE curriculum entitled Learning About Sex. The program was recommended by New York State Education Department as “one of the best for teens”.[54]  Kelly was also editor of Journal of Sex Education and Therapy, and charter editorial board member of the American Journal of Sexuality Education, and wrote the college textbook Sexuality Today[55] – one of the most frequently adopted sexuality texts in its field in the U.S.[56]  Learning About Sex won American Library Association’s “Best Book for Young Adults” award[57]. The program includes the following statements:

 

  • “Sado-masochism [inflicting pain for sexual purposes] may be very acceptable and safe for sexual partners who know each other’s needs and have established agreements for what they want from each other … Some people are now saying that partnerships — married or unmarried — should not be exclusive. They believe that while a primary relationship is maintained with one person, the freedom for both partners to love and share sex with others should also be present. … A fair percentage of people probably have some sort of sexual contact with an animal during their lifetime, particularly boys who live on farms. There are no indications that such animal contacts are harmful, except for the obvious dangers of poor hygiene, injury by the animal, or guilt on the part of the human.”[58]

It’s Perfectly Normal

It’s Perfectly Normal[59] is a CSE resource written by by Robie Harris, a member of Planned Parenthood Board of Advocates. The book is designed for children, starting at age 10, and is filled with graphic colored illustrations of naked boys, girls, men and women (one of which is used as the photo accompanying this article, with explicit areas blacked out by this author). The resource provides explicit explanations of masturbation and intercourse, and addresses many other sexual activities in which people can engage. The chapter on homosexuality assures students of its normality, asserting that “Some people disapprove of gay men and lesbian women…Usually these people know little or nothing about homosexuals, and their views are often based on fears or misinformation, not on facts.”[60] The resource further discusses contraceptives and illustrates how to put on a condom. It also lists nine reasons for having an abortion.[61]

Conclusion

This is just a sampling of the CSE material used with children across the globe and here in the U.S No matter where you look, on the world stage, the theme is the same: Sexual expression is a fundamental right that cannot be, with very limited exceptions, curtailed in any way.  Sexual orientation is innate, gender is not. Everyone, including children, should experiment with their sexuality in order to attain full sexual lives. Anything that attempts to put guidelines around sexuality must be adamantly opposed as infringement on human rights.

These are, contrary to what secular sexuality proponents claim, values about sex – secular values. And they are being actively disseminated on the world stage to children everywhere, including those in America.

Although decisions about sex education are still made on a local basis in the United States, more and more school districts are moving toward offering CSE curricula for students, with its thoroughly secular worldview. Parents have a responsibility to investigate the materials used with their children, and to protect their kids from a sexual philosophy that encourages childhood experimentation, emphasizes all sexual expression as equally valid, minimizes the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects and consequences of sex, overrides parental authority, and introduces explicit sexual imagery and concepts as soon as children begin school.

But secular sex values are not confined to merely children’s education. They have become the dominant baseline for sex in virtually every area of cultural life – academia, public policy, media, and public perception. Abortion cast as “women’s health”, lowered ages of consent for statutory rape, casual sex in virtually every form of entertainment, the push for gay marriage, quickie divorces – all sharks swimming in the pond of secular sexuality. The view that people have a right to sexual pleasure on their own terms, and that sex can be separated from its marital and familial context, has had tremendous physical, emotional, spiritual, and cultural consequences.

A secular philosophy of sex leads to a secular philosophy of the world.

The next article will address how secular values of sex have their roots in a pervasive, destructive sexual agenda of which few people are aware – an agenda that has infiltrated every part of American cultural life, and which threatens to undermine the very values upon which this nation was founded.

Sex isn’t, and never has been, just about what happens in the bedroom. In fact, it has the power to determine how we understand all of life.


[1] Martin, S.; Rector, R. & Pardue, M. G. (2004). “Comprehensive Sex Education vs. Authentic Abstinence: A Study of Competing Criteria.” The Heritage Foundation. P. v. Retrieved from http://thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com/2004/pdf/67539_1.pdf

[2] Martin, S.; Rector, R. & Pardue, M. G. (2004). “Comprehensive Sex Education vs. Authentic Abstinence: A Study of Competing Criteria.” The Heritage Foundation. P. xii. http://thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com/2004/pdf/67539_1.pdf

[3] Martin, S.; Rector, R. & Pardue, M. G. (2004). “Comprehensive Sex Education vs. Authentic Abstinence: A Study of Competing Criteria.” The Heritage Foundation. Retrieved from http://thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com/2004/pdf/67539_1.pdf

[4] SIECUS (2004). “Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Kindergarten-12th Grade. 3rd Ed. Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. Retrieved from http://www.siecus.org/_data/global/images/guidelines.pdf

SIECUS (2008). “What is Comprehensive Sexuality Education?” Retrieved from http://www.communityactionkit.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageId=888

[5] Martin, S.; Rector, R. & Pardue, M. G. (2004). “Comprehensive Sex Education vs. Authentic Abstinence: A Study of Competing Criteria.” The Heritage Foundation. P. v. Retrieved from http://thf_media.s3.amazonaws.com/2004/pdf/67539_1.pdf

[6] SIECUS. “Community Action Kit”. http://www.communityactionkit.org/index.cfm?pageid=885

[7] Kim, C. & Rector, R. (2010, Feb. 19). “Evidence of Effectiveness of Abstinence Education: An Update”. The Heritage Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2010/02/evidence-on-the-effectiveness-of-abstinence-education-an-update

Rector, R. E. (2002, April 8). “The Effectiveness of Abstinence Education Programs in Reducing Sexual Activity Among Youth”. The Heritage Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.montgomerycollege.edu/Departments/enreadtp/Abstinence02.pdf

Hayes, A. (2010, Feb. 2). “Study: Abstinence Program Most Effective at Delaying Sex Among Youths”. CNN. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/02/02/abstinence.study/index.html

Stan E. Weed, Ph.D. et al. (2007, June 8). “’Abstinence’ or ‘Comprehensive Sex Education’”? The Institute for Research and Evaluation. Retrieved from http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2007_docs/CompSexEd.pdf

Johnson, B. (2012, Apr. 4). “Abstinence Education Reduces Teen Sex Rates, Study Shows”. Life Site News. Retrieved from http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/abstinence-education-reduces-teen-sex-rates-study-shows/

[8] Family Watch International “Special Report, Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Sexual Rights vs. Sexual Health”. Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/documents/Special_Report_CSE_Revised_1_12.pdf

[9] Watson, C. & Brazier, E. Eds. (2000). You, Your Life, Your Dreams. New York: Family Care International. Retrieved from http://familycareintl.org/en/resources/publications/14

[10]Taller de salud sexual y reproductiva para madres y embarazadas adolescentes: Propuesta Metodologica. [Workshop on Sexual and Reproductive Health for Mothers and Pregnant Teens] (Mexico: DIF/UNICEF, 1999), p. 89 [translation from Spanish].  As quoted in Slater, S. (2009). “A Plan to Defend the Family at the UN”. Family Watch International. Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/FinalWCFNigeriaSpeech.pdf

[11] Manual de Consejeria Para Adolescentes, Copyright Fondo de Poblacion de las Naciones Unidas

(FNUAP) [English Translation: Manual for Counseling Adolescents, Copyright UNFPA], Managua, Nicaragua (December 2000), p. 33. As quoted in Slater, S. (2009). “A Plan to Defend the Family at the UN”. Family Watch International and Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/FinalWCFNigeriaSpeech.pdf. Also quoted in Family Watch International “Special Report, Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Sexual Rights vs. Sexual Health”. Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/documents/Special_Report_CSE_Revised_1_12.pdf

[12] Manual de Consejeria Para Adolescentes, Copyright Fondo de Poblacion de las Naciones Unidas

(FNUAP) [English Translation: Manual for Counseling Adolescents, Copyright UNFPA], Managua, Nicaragua (December 2000), p. 59. As quoted in Slater, S. (2009). “A Plan to Defend the Family at the UN”. Family Watch International http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/FinalWCFNigeriaSpeech.pdf. Also quoted in Family Watch International “Special Report, Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Sexual Rights vs. Sexual Health”. Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/documents/Special_Report_CSE_Revised_1_12.pdf

[13] IPPF (2010, February). “Healthy, Happy, and Hot: A Young Person’s Guide to Their Rights, Sexuality, and Living With HIV”. Retrieved from http://ippf.org/resource/Healthy-Happy-and-Hot-young-peoples-guide-rights

[14] Masland, M. (2013). “Carnal Knowledge: The Sex Ed Debate”. NBC News. Retrieved from http://www.nbcnews.com/id/3071001/ns/health-childrens_health/t/carnal-knowledge-sex-ed-debate/#.UcSxtOsi3qQ

[15] Bohon, D. (2013, March 14). “Chicago Public Schools to Start Sex Education in Kindergarten.” The New American. Retrieved from http://www.thenewamerican.com/culture/faith-and-morals/item/14786-chicago-public-schools-to-start-sex-education-in-kindergarten

[16] SIECUS. Community Action Kit. “Getting Ready to Advocate”; “Working With Key Players”; “Getting Your Message Out”, “Knowing Your Opposition”. Retrieved from http://www.communityactionkit.org/index.cfm?pageid=897

[17] Rabin, R. C. (2010, May 10). “New Spending for a Wider Range of Sex Education”. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/11/health/policy/11land.html?_r=0

Higgins, L. (2010, Sept. 28). “Governor Quinn in Minority in Rejecting Title V Abstinence Education Funds”. Illinois Family Institute. Retrieved from http://illinoisfamily.org/education/governor-quinn-in-the-minority-in-rejecting-title-v-abstinence-education-funds/

[18] Guttmacher Institute (2013, June 1). “Sex and HIV Education”. State Policies in Brief. Retrieved from http://www.guttmacher.org/statecenter/spibs/spib_SE.pdf

[19] Reisman, J., & Eichel, E. W.. Muir, J. G. & Court, J. H. Eds. (1990). Kinsey, Sex and Fraud: The Indoctrination of a People. Lochinvar-Huntington House, Lafayette, LA. P. 123. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/Kinsey_Sex_and_Fraud.pdf

Reisman, J. (1996). RSVP America. First Principles, Inc.: Crestwood, KY.  Pp. 19-21. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/RSVP-optim.pdf

[20] Family Watch International “Special Report, Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Sexual Rights vs. Sexual Health”. Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/documents/Special_Report_CSE_Revised_1_12.pdf

SIECUS. “History”. Retrieved from http://www.siecus.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageId=493&parentID=472

[21] Jeffrey, L. & Ray, R. D. (2007). “A History of the American Law Institute’s Model Penal Code: The Kinsey Report’s Influence on ‘Science-Based’ Legal Reform”. First Principles, Inc. p. 32. Presented by RSVP America Campaign. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/monograph_opt.pdf

Renshaw, D. C. (1987, Dec. 25). “Sexuality and Medicine”. The Journal of the American Medical Association. 258(24). Retrieved from http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=369964

Family Watch International “Special Report, Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Sexual Rights vs. Sexual Health”. Retrieved from http://www.familywatchinternational.org/fwi/documents/Special_Report_CSE_Revised_1_12.pdf

Warner, V. & Hutch, T. (1997, June). “Kids and Sex: The Kinsey Connection”. Concerned Women for America. Retrieved from http://www.cwfa.org/content.asp?id=855

[22] Renshaw, D. C. (1987, Dec. 25). “Sexuality and Medicine”. Journal of the American Medical Association, 258(24). Retrieved from http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=369964

“Kinsey’s Fraud Invades the Church” (2000, March 15). World News Daily. Retrieved from http://www.wnd.com/2000/03/2935/

[23] Reisman, J. (1996). RSVP America. First Principles, Inc.: Crestwood, KY.  P. 19. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/RSVP-optim.pdf

Reisman, J. (2003). 3rd Ed. Kinsey: Crimes & Consequences. p. 176. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/chapter7.pdf

[24] SIECUS website. “About Us”. Retrieved from http://www.siecus.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageId=472

[25] Ob. Gyn News. December 1, 1980, p. 10. Quoted in Reisman, J., & Eichel, E. W.. Muir, J. G. & Court, J. H. Eds. (1990). Kinsey, Sex and Fraud: The Indoctrination of a People. Lochinvar-Huntington House, Lafayette, LA. p. 6. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/Kinsey_Sex_and_Fraud.pdf

[26] UNESCO (2009). International Guidelines on Sexuality Education: An Evidence Informed Approach to Effective Sex Relationships and HIV/STI Education. Retrieved from http://www.foxnews.com/projects/pdf/082509_unesco.pdf

[27] SIECUS (2004). Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Kindergarten-12th Grade.” 3rd Ed. Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. Retrieved from http://www.siecus.org/_data/global/images/guidelines.pdf. Can also be retrieved from http://www.siecus.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page.viewPage&pageId=516&grandparentID=477&parentID=514

[28] Oppenheimer, M. (2003). Knocking on Heaven’s Door.: American Religion in the Age of Counterculture. Vail-Ballou Press: Binghamton, NY. P. 50.

[29] “Unitarian Universalist Association. Department of Education and Social Concerns, About Your Sexuality. Records, 1970-1983.” Andover-Harvard Theological Library. Retrieved from http://www.hds.harvard.edu/library/bms/bms01290.html

[30] Reisman, J., & Eichel, E. W.. Muir, J. G. & Court, J. H. Eds. (1990). Kinsey, Sex and Fraud: The Indoctrination of a People. Lochinvar-Huntington House, Lafayette, LA. Pp. 159-160. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/Kinsey_Sex_and_Fraud.pdf

Millspaugh, Rev. Sarah G. (2010). “In Context: A study of the About Your Sexuality Curriculum and its Times”. A paper for the 2010 Joint Conference of Collegium and the Partnership in Unitarian Universalist History and Heritage, Waltham, MA. Retrieved from  http://www.uucollegium.org/Research%20papers/10paper_Millspaugh.pdf

[31] Reisman, J., & Eichel, E. W.. Muir, J. G. & Court, J. H. Eds. (1990). Kinsey, Sex and Fraud: The Indoctrination of a People. Lochinvar-Huntington House, Lafayette, LA. P. 159. Retrieved from http://www.drjudithreisman.com/archives/Kinsey_Sex_and_Fraud.pdf

[32] Our Whole Lives Teacher Training. Retrieved from http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e7ihgggl744e4341&llr=f8rafhcab

Kennedy, D. (1999). “From Liberation to Health: The New UUA Sexuality Curriculum”. World: The Journal of the Unitarian Universalist Association. Retrieved from http://www.uuworld.org/1999/0999feat3.html

[33] Kennedy, D. (1999). “From Liberation to Health: The New UUA Sexuality Curriculum”. World: The Journal of the Unitarian Universalist Association. Retrieved from http://www.uuworld.org/1999/0999feat3.html

[34] University of Minnesota (2013). “Promoting Sexual Literacy: Promoting Sexual Literacy Through Sexuality Films”. University of Minnesota. Family Medicine and Community Health. Retrieved from http://www.phs.umn.edu/newsletter/fall08/literacy/home.html

[35] Gitchell, S. & Foster, L. (1986). Let’s Talk About S-E-X. Planned Parenthood of Central California. As quoted in American Life League’s STOPP International. “Specific Planned Parenthood Sex Education Programs”. Retrieved from http://www.stopp.org/article.php?id=4898

[36] American Library Association. “The 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990-2000.” Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=bbwlinks&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=85714

[37] Kilpatrick, W. (1993). Why Johnny Can’t Tell Right From Wrong: And What We Can Do About It. New York: Simon and Schuster. P. 66

[38] Pomeroy, W. (1981). Girls and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. p. 48 & 52. As quoted in Bartlett, L. (2011, Aug. 4). “Planned Parenthood: Oh What a Web It Weaves”. Ezerwoman’s Blog. Retrieved from http://ezerwoman.wordpress.com/2011/08/04/planned-parenthood-oh-what-a-web-it-weaves/

[39] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. P. 144.

[40] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. P. 49.

[41] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. Pp. 51-53.

[42] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. P. 120.

[43] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. Pp. 99-100.

[44] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. Pp. 56-57.

[45] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. P. 143.

[46] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. P. 162.

[47] Wardell P. (1981). Boys and Sex New York: Delacorte Press. Pp. 171 and 172. As quoted in American Life League. Pro-Life Activist’s Encyclopedia. “Chapter 133 – Pornography: Something for Every Perverted Taste”. http://www.ewtn.com/library/PROLENC/ENCYC133.HTM

[48] Pomeroy, W. (1991). Boys and Sex. New York: Delacorte Press. P. 161.

[49] Bell, R. (1998). Changing Bodies, Changing Lives: A Book for Teens on Sex and Relationships. Expanded 3rd Ed. New York: Random House, Inc. Excerpts can be retrieved from http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/publications/cbclex.asp

[50] Human Life International (2013). “Facts of Life: Chapter 17: Sex Education and School-Based Clinics: Some Examples of the Material Used in Comprehensive Sexuality Education”. Retrieved from http://www.hli.org/cloning/521?task=view

[51] Excerpt can be retrieved from http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/publications/cbclex4b.asp

[52] Excerpt can be retrieved from http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/publications/cbclex4b.asp

[53] Excerpt can be retrieved from http://www.ourbodiesourselves.org/publications/cbclex4.asp

[54] About Gary F. Kelly. Gary F. Kelly’s official website. Retrieved from http://garyfkelly.com/About_Gary_F.html

[55] McGraw-Hill Higher Education (2011). “About the Author: Gary F. Kelly.” Retrieved from http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0073531995/information_center_view0/about_the_author.html

[56] “Other Books by Gary F. Kelly”. Gary F. Kelly official website. Retrieved from http://garyfkelly.com/Other_Books.html

[57] “Other Books by Gary F. Kelly”. Gary F. Kelly official website. Retrieved from http://garyfkelly.com/Other_Books.html

[58] Kelly, G. F (1968). Learning About Sex: The Contemporary Guide for Young Adults. New York: Barron’s. pp. 61 and 136. As quoted in Human Life International (2013). “Facts of Life: Chapter 17: Sex Education and School-Based Clinics: Some Examples of the Material Used in Comprehensive Sexuality Education”. Retrieved from http://www.hli.org/cloning/521?task=view

Also quoted in Gene Antonio. “America’s XXX-Rated Sex Education Curricula.” New Dimensions Magazine, September 1990, pages 72 to 77.

Also quoted in American Life League. Pro-Life Activist’s Encyclopedia. “Chapter 133 -Pornography: Something for Every Perverted Taste.” Retrieved from http://prolife.ath.cx:8000/plae133.html

[59] Harris, R. H. (2009). It’s Perfectly Normal. Candlewick Press: Somerville, MA.

[60] Harris, R. H. (2009). It’s Perfectly Normal. Candlewick Press: Somerville, MA. P. 18.

[61] Harris, R. H. (2009). It’s Perfectly Normal. Candlewick Press: Somerville, MA.

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